About Capital Harvest

The concept of Capital Harvest originated in 2004 when Faans Roos and Johan du Toit developed a financing product for export fruit farmers where only a cession of crop is registered as the main security for the facility.

After various meetings with potential capital providers they crossed paths with AFGRI Limited, the largest agriculture focus-group on the Johannesburg stock exchange. A transaction was concluded in terms of which the Western Cape operations of AFGRI were transferred to a new company, AFGRI Western Cape (Pty) Ltd t/a Capital Harvest, with management and AFGRI as shareholders. With the backing of AFGRI, Capital Harvest could now, in addition to production finance, also offer clients all the financial products available at the commercial banks. On 1 June 2007 AFGRI Western Cape (Pty) Ltd t/a Capital Harvest opened its doors in Stellenbosch.

The company initially consisted of 5 staff members with a debtor book of R70 million. By the end of February 2010 Capital Harvest doubled its staff and grew the debtor book to R420 million.

Early in 2009 AFGRI made the executive decision to reposition its operations. The decision was to focus on their core business: grain and grain related agriculture business and to sell all non-core interests.

This presented the opportunity to management to purchase and transfer the business from AFGRI Western Cape (Pty) Ltd to a new company, Capital Harvest (Pty) Ltd. The challenge was to find an alternative financier to provide credit lines to Capital Harvest. The Land Bank was approached and during December 2009 the Land Bank approved a separate credit line for Capital Harvest.

This allowed management to negotiate with AFGRI and during February 2010 the contract with AFGRI was signed for the purchase of the business from AFGRI Western Cape (Pty) Ltd. The transaction was announced on the Johannesburg stock exchange notice board (JSE SENS) with 1 June 2010 as the effective date.

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Capital Harvest

In The Community

Robela Family Trust

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Stellenbosch Community Development Programme

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Robela Family Trust

The Robela family owns a farm of 27 ha outside Magaliesburg where they grow vegetables (mainly in tunnels). The farm was devastated by a fire late 2012 and since the farm was not insured, the Robela family lost their means to generating income.

After more than 14 months of continuous unsuccessful attempts to raise finance with various financial institutions, the Robela Family was ready to sell the farm and give up on their hard work and dream of becoming successful, commercial vegetable farmers.

Early in 2014, the Robela family were told of Capital Harvest Emerging Farmer Finance ("CHEFF") and submitted a finance request. Shortly there-after the Capital Harvest team paid two visits to the farm and quickly realised the potential, not only of the Robela family, but also of transforming the farm into a successful commercial unit. Through close interaction between CHEFF , the Robela family and their mentors, DICLA Training Centre, a detailed business plan to restore infrastructure on the farm and return the farm to a profitable vegetable growing concern, was completed. A revolving credit line was approved by CHEFF for the necessary capex and production inputs for 12 months and on 29 May 2014 the transaction between CHEFF and the Robela Family Trust was concluded.

As part of Capital Harvest's commitment to the success of emerging farmers in South Africa, Capital Harvest provided the Robela family with a sponsored Ford Ranger 2.2 TDCi to provide the family with much needed transport.

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Stellenbosch Community Development Programme

The Stellenbosch Community Development Programme (SCDP) is a non-profit, donor-funded, public-benefit organisation. It is based in Kayamandi, a peri-urban area where the majority of residents (30 000) come in search of work. Most live in informal settlements and in dire poverty. This, coupled with a high incidence of illiteracy and HIV/Aids, makes Kayamandi a community in desperate need of assistance. 

The SCDP provides the malnourished school children of Kayamandi something to eat on a daily basis. To this end, 1 800 children receive a meal every day. The programme is also aimed at mentoring families into sustainable livelihoods with numerous programs aimed at skills transfer to unemployed residents. As part of the programme, monthly food parcel is a supportive intervention for six months while mothers/fathers develop the necessary skills to start community-based business as well as to get jobs in the formal sector. Capital Harvest contributes financially to SCDP as part of our investment into the Stellenbosch community.

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